Author Archives: aseasyasriding

Don’t confuse vociferous opposition with public opinion

It’s fundamentally important to bear in mind that the (sometimes vociferous) opposition to cycling infrastructure does not in any way represent mainstream attitudes and opinions. The vast majority of the British public are open to persuasion on cycling infrastructure; they … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigning, Inclusivity, Infrastructure | 14 Comments

The language of compromise

Along with many others, I’ve banged on for a long time about the inherent problems of ‘dual provision’ – the idea that you can provide two different types of cycle provision, in parallel, for different types of users. Typically this … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 23 Comments

How to respond to a cycling scheme – an objector’s guide

A while back I wrote a helpful guide for journalists thinking about writing a lazy article about cycling. In a similar vein – and with so much attention now being focused on new cycling infrastructure, particularly from objectors – I … Continue reading

Posted in Campaigning | 20 Comments

Good road design is not conditional on the good behaviour of users

I can’t really believe I am having to write a piece saying this, but good road design is not conditional on the good behaviour of users. Why am I having to say this? Because Boris Johnson and Leon Daniels – … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 24 Comments

Cycling privilege

One particularly puzzling aspect of attitudes to cycling in Britain is how this simple mode of transport is seen (or misrepresented) as being elitist, or exclusive, in some way, shape or form. Whether it’s the claim that it’s male-dominated, or white, or … Continue reading

Posted in Cycle Superhighways, Infrastructure, Mobility | 31 Comments

A second attempt at the A24 in Morden – and it’s still not good enough

I went to an interesting talk at the Guardian’s offices in London yesterday evening, entitled ‘What Can We Do to Get More People Cycling in London?’, featuring a panel of Chris Boardman, Andrew Gilligan, Rachel Aldred, Peter Walker and – … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments

Removing isn’t always better – the problem with the ‘shared space’ term

John Dales’ recent column for TransportXtra argued that the term ‘shared space’ should be quietly phased out. In fact he doesn’t even use the words in the article, replacing them with Sh… ! … the use of the term Sh… … Continue reading

Posted in Bath, Infrastructure, Oxford, Shared Space, The Netherlands, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Dangerous is legal, safe is illegal

This (short) post is going to look at a paradoxical situation in British road road design, one that means that a very dangerous way of dealing with turning conflicts is legal, while a much safer way of dealing with those … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 14 Comments

Transport choice

What does ‘mass cycling’ mean? It doesn’t mean everyone has to cycle, for every single trip. It’s worth bearing in mind that, even in the Netherlands, where cycling is a universal mode of transport, cycling only accounts for 27% of all … Continue reading

Posted in Car dependence, Cycling policy, Infrastructure, The Netherlands, Transport choice | 7 Comments

Cycling along a new Highways Agency scheme

Between 2011 and 2014, a relatively short 2.5 mile stretch of the A23 (the trunk road running between London and Brighton, on the south coast) was widened from two lanes in each direction, to three. This was a £79 million … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 27 Comments