Category Archives: Cycling renaissance

Where are Britain’s practical bikes?

One of the many impressions from my recent trip to the Netherlands is how everybody rides pretty much the same bike. This is the basic – and pretty indestructible – classic Dutch bike. It’s either single speed, or has hub … Continue reading

Posted in Cycle sport, Cycling renaissance, Helmets, Infrastructure, Subjective safety, The Netherlands | 121 Comments

Britain’s exclusionary roads and streets

A recent news item from Epping should come as no surprise to anyone who understands the reasons why people don’t cycle in Britain. A head teacher has moved to explain changes to plans for the first new school the district … Continue reading

Posted in Cycling Embassy Of Great Britain, Cycling policy, Cycling renaissance, Department for Transport, Infrastructure, Subjective safety, The Netherlands, Uncategorized | 35 Comments

Some London cycling statistics

While digesting over the Christmas period, I’ve also been rummaging around in the latest Travel in London Report [pdf] from Transport for London, published last week. There are some interesting trends emerging with regard to cycling. First of all, it’s worth taking … Continue reading

Posted in Boris Johnson, Bow Roundabout, Cycling renaissance, Go Dutch, Infrastructure, LCC, London, Subjective safety, Transport for London | 15 Comments

Signs of hope

You may remember that in August, Philip Circus, a Horsham District Councillor, wrote a piece for the West Sussex County Times entitled Why British cyclists are not always heroes. The article, which I responded to here, actually bears a great deal … Continue reading

Posted in 20 mph limits, Cycling renaissance, Dangerous driving, Horsham, Horsham District Council, Road safety, Street closures | 8 Comments

Bradley Wiggins selling onions

A cartoon from the current edition of Private Eye, that made me smile. The joke, of course, lies in the new dominance of British cycling in a French race, and an extension of that dominance, beyond cycle sport, to a … Continue reading

Posted in Cycle sport, Cycling policy, Cycling renaissance, The media, The Netherlands | 5 Comments

‘A very safe activity’

David Hembrow has recently posted a piece about a family in Cambridge who are considering giving up cycling – this after a nasty incident on a roundabout, in which a van struck the mother’s bakfiets, with her baby in it. … Continue reading

Posted in CTC, Cycling policy, Cycling renaissance, Infrastructure, Road safety, Safety In Numbers | 23 Comments

The winds of change?

Over the last week, I’ve spotted something rather strange happening in Horsham. A Dutch invasion. A practical Batavus. An ancient Gazelle. A child’s Batavus. But the invasion isn’t limited to Dutch bicycles – some British bicycles are getting in on … Continue reading

Posted in Cycling renaissance, Horsham, Infrastructure, Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Giving cyclists a bad name

Picture courtesy of road.cc You may remember this story from last year. An Iraqi Kurd whose initial claim for asylum in the UK had been turned down was allowed to stay because immigration judges in Manchester ruled that, as he … Continue reading

Posted in Cycling policy, Cycling renaissance, Uncategorized | 11 Comments

What should ‘Going Dutch’ mean?

Matthew Wright’s article in the Guardian yesterday was entitled There’s more to ‘going Dutch’ than having a separate cycling lane To which the obvious, superficial, response is ‘no shit Sherlock’, and the longer, more detailed response would be as follows. … Continue reading

Posted in Cycling renaissance, Infrastructure, John Franklin, LCC, London, The Netherlands | 5 Comments

Transport for London – Selling Cycling By Deception

Inspired by Freewheeler’s recent experience of Transport for London cycling propaganda, I decided to take a closer look at one of their adverts, one featuring Edith Bowman. This advert dates from last year, and is designed to promote the Cycle … Continue reading

Posted in Cycling policy, Cycling renaissance, Transport for London | 4 Comments